Dr Helen Pearson Public Lecture: 150 years of Nature, the past, present and future of a leading journal

Thurs 26 Sept 6.00 - 7.00pm 

St David’s Lecture Theatre  FREE EVENT

2019 marks the 150th anniversary of Nature, the most authoritative scientific journal in the world. The history of Nature mirrors how science and its role in society have changed over that time. Helen Pearson, Nature’s Chief Magazine Editor, will talk about the journal’s rich legacy and its continued mission to serve the global research community and communicate the results of science worldwide

Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/150-years-of-nature-the-past-present-and-future-of-a-leading-science-journal-tickets-70220751157?aff=ebdshpsearchautocomplete

Backstory - Heritage in Words, Pictures, and Threads

Wed 25 Sept: 6.00pm - 7.00pm 

Castle 1, University of Otago.

FREE EVENT

We bring four individuals together to talk about an expansive and inclusive concept of cultural heritage through the lenses of literature, literary criticism, film, and textiles:

  • Tina Makereti grew her latest novel, The Imaginary Lives of James Pōneke, from an 1846 article in the London Times
  • Lisa Chatfield is charged with bringing 1860s’ Dunedin and the West Coast to life as producer of the BBC-adaptation of The Luminaries, Eleanor Catton's Booker Prize-winning novel
  • Catherine Smith’s current research focus is the interdisciplinary analysis of Māori textiles based on a background in archaeology and conservation of cultural materials
  • Madeleine Seys is an expert in the narrative and sartorial threads of Victorian popular literature.

Chaired by Kirby-Jane Hallum and supported by Dunedin City of Literature

Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/back-story-heritage-through-words-pictures-and-threads-tickets-70220582653?aff=ebdshpsearchautocomplete

1869 Conference Saturday Morning Sessions

Sat 28 September

1869 Conference Day Pass, 9:00 am – 12:30 pm, St David Lecture Theatre Complex, $45 (includes morning tea)

Register Here: www.otago.ac.nz/1869/registration

9.00 – 11.00am        Concurrent Sessions:

Landscapes:

  • Jonathan West, ‘You see the blank on the map? I wish you to fill it up: James McKerrow’s exploration of the southern lakes in the 1860s'.
  • James Beattie and Warwick Brunton, ‘The Place and Power of Natural History in Colonization: William Lauder Lindsay and the scientific development of Otago’s human and natural resources, 1860-80'.
  • Matthew Schmidt, 'Dunedin – a City Built on Reclamation'.
  • Jane McCabe, 'A Pivotal Year: Land Alienation and Entitlement in Taieri and Hokianga'.                

Intellectual Networks:

  • Peter Clayworth, Sketchy Histories: What were the 1860s Pakeha views of Maori migration to New Zealand.
  • John O’Leary, Hand-axes, saurian and kobongs: Governor Grey’s London year.
  • Kate Hannah, Correspondence, Colenso, and cultural shifts: Visualising New Zealand in 1869.
  • Helene Connor, Reflections on the letters of Geraldine Ensor Jewsbury (1812–80) to Walter Durrant Mantell (1820–95) with a focus on 1869.

Dunedin People, Places and Institutions:

  • Lyall Hanton, Joseph Mellor: the man who described the Periodic Table in 16 million words Tom Barker and John Isdale, Thames School of Mines.
  • Susan Irvine and Sarah Gallagher, Blowing Up Boundaries.
  • Rosi Crane Beyond Albums and Paintbrushes: Women and the Otago Museum, 1869-1936.

Reformers and Campaigners:

  • Anna Clark, 'Josephine Butler’s Women’s Work and Women’s Culture (1869): The paradoxes of individualism in Britain and New Zealand'.
  • Chieko Ichikawa, 'Women’s Writing on Sex: Rhetoric and Gender in the Social Purity Movement'.
  • Jane Tolerton, 'Otago’s Three Women’s Suffrage Movements: 1869-1893'.
  • Joanne Wilkes, 'Middlemarch and Reform: Looking Back from 1869'.  
       

11:00am - 11: 30am               Morning Tea

Tea, coffee, water, crumpets with cream and baked custard pots with raspberry jelly.

11.30am - 12.30pm       Keynote Address: Tilly Boleyn, 'Breaking the Rules, Transforming the Future'

St David Theatre Lecture

Scientific and cultural institutions worldwide have traditionally focused on knowledge creation and production. But what then? How do you engage the 'general public' with all your excellent knowledge? And how do you share that knowledge to create a scientifically literate society ready to tackle the world's biggest challenges?

This paper explores the evolution of approaches to engaging people with science and culture. Case studies, including cabinets of curiosities, World Fairs, science centres, museums, and the Science Gallery approach, illustrate some of the complexities at play when we invite people into our hallowed halls to see ‘the thing’. Have we, as a sector, become better at engagement over the last 150 years? What do we all mean by engagement anyway?

Fear not, Science Gallery Melbourne (SGM) is opening in 2020 with the aim of blurring the boundaries between science, art, design, technology, maths, and engineering. We’ve flipped engagement on its head, and instead embed our target audience, young people aged 15-25, into every aspect of our approach: idea generation, exhibition planning, work selection, promotion, and in-gallery engagement. This presentation takes audience members through what happens when you connect and involve young people in the creation of a new gallery…the agony and ecstasy of curating with young people, for young people.

This paper challenges the traditional narrative about who’s opinion matters, how to engage young people in important issues and what makes a transformational experience. Prepare for feathers to be ruffled.

Gala Dinner Lanarch Castle

Friday 27 Sept: 6.00 - 10.00pm

Larnach Castle  $161.06 (INCL GST and fees) includes transport, self-guided tour, canapés and beverage on arrival, three-course meal and complimentary wines on the table.

Situated on the picturesque Otago Peninsula, Larnach Castle is one of New Zealand’s premier visitor attractions. Lovingly restored by the Barker Family, the Castle and surrounding grounds are at the heart of the Dunedin visitor experience. Larnach Castle has received numerous national and international accolades.

Our dinner speaker, Professor Liam McIlvanney, Otago’s inaugural Stuart Professor of Scottish Studies, will comment on early predominantly Scottish early Otago’s lead in education in New Zealand. M.C. William McKee, Toitu Otago Settlers Musuem.

Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/larnach-castle-gala-dinner-1869-conference-tickets-70223754139?aff=ebdshpsearchautocomplete

University of Otago Heritage Buildings Walks - Saturday

Sat 28 September 1.30 - 2.30pm 

FREE

See Dunedin Gothic en masse and at its finest on the University of Otago campus with a walking tour of Heritage New Zealand’s listed places. Learn about the people that built these places, and the trials and tribulations of of New Zealand's oldest university as it expanded.

Book a guided tour with local experts from Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga and Southern Heritage Trust. Tours are limited so secure your place now.

Meet outside the University of Otago Visitors' Centre and Gift Shop at least 10 minutes before your selected tour is scheduled to begin.

Register: https://forms.gle/faoPZSRZuesRS3LC8

W.D. Trotter Anatomy Museum Guided Tours

 Sun 29 September

FREE

Tour Times:

9.30am - 11.00am

11.30am - 1.00pm

1.30pm - 3.00pm     

 

The Anatomy Museum holds a large collection of anatomical specimens and models, many of which are unique in Oceania. Many of the models and specimens date back at least 100 years. Displayed alongside the more modern specimens of anatomy, a walk around the museum brings to life the wonders of the human body.

Bookings are essential (maximum 40 participants per tour). No food or drink permitted in the museum. No cameras or other visual recording devices are permitted in the museum.

Register: https://forms.gle/PNan346qXrzXXbVM6

Walking Tours of Dunedin's Shoreline in 1865

FREE

Tour Times

10.00am - 11.00am

1:00pm - 2:00pm     

 

When the first Pakeha settlers stepped onto land next to the Toitu Stream in 1848 in a location near the top of today's Water Street, they were greeted with a shoreline which quickly rose upwards towards Dunedin’s hilly and forested flanks. The plan for the city devised in 1846 already considered reclamation of the harbour to provide more flat land for industry and government close to where ships would anchor or dock. Reclamation began immediately as the day-to-day workings of a new colony dumped anything they did not want or could not use into the harbour. Things dramatically changed in 1861 with the discovery of gold in Otago. From this date onwards, Dunedin expanded rapidly as people from all walks of life flooded into the city. Step back in time and walk along Dunedin’s shoreline in 1865 for a tour of early Maori and Pakeha Dunedin!

Book a guided tour with Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga's Dr Matthew Schmidt.

This is a popular tour. Tour numbers are limited so secure your place now.

Meet at the Exchange Plaza, 263 Princes Street beside the Tauraka Waka monument at least 10 minutes before your selected tour is scheduled to begin.

Register: https://forms.gle/UuA3JfThbdpfcDRP7

University of Otago Heritage Buildings Walks - Sunday

Sun 29 September  

FREE

Tour times:

11:30am - 12:30pm

3:30pm - 4:30pm

See Dunedin Gothic en masse and at its finest on the University of Otago campus with a walking tour of Heritage New Zealand’s listed places. Learn about the people that built these places, and the trials and tribulations of of New Zealand's oldest university as it expanded.

Book a guided tour with local experts from Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga and Southern Heritage Trust. Tours are limited so secure your place now.

Meet outside the University of Otago Visitors' Centre and Gift Shop at least 10 minutes before your selected tour is scheduled to begin.

Register: https://forms.gle/faoPZSRZuesRS3LC8